St Andrew Parish Church, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004

Jevington Church is dedicated to St Andrew, whose cross can be seen in various places in the building and on the gable end of the Chancel roof.  The seafaring connections are symbolised by the unusual Anchor Cross above the south porch and nave roof.  The walls are constructed from local flint and green sandstone, quarried in the area of the Wish Tower, Eastbourne.

St Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTC

The chancel arch appears to be Early English. It is narrow and the arch is not symmetrical.  Some experts suggest that this could indicate the possibility that it is an earlier Norman Arch which has been altered. The squints, or hagioscopes, were originally angled but were unfortunately straightened by the Victorians.  The nave roof is a Tudor Wagon roof with alternating hammer beams and king posts.

St Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTCSt Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTC

These windows in the nave depict St George, St John the Apostle, St Andrew and St Philip.

St Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTCSt Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTC

This Saxon sculpture set into the north wall of the nave at the west end was discovered by Sir William Burrell under the tower floor in 1785.  Archaeologists believe it dates from AD 950 and depicts Christ, wearing his resurrection garment, thrusting a cross-shaped sword into the mouth of a beast, "Good triumphing over evil".  The two beasts at the feet of Christ show interlacing, typical of the Urnes style of decoration and the Viking influence.  It is a rare example and one of only a few discovered in England.  Its purpose is not certain but it may have been a mural or an early day visual aid for teaching purposes.  It may have been hidden under the floor safety during the Commonwealth period.

St Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTC

The font of green sandstone dates from 1400 and is typical of others found locally.  The lead bowl is approximately 100 years earlier and there are traces of an early lock and hinges.  A 13th century Canon Law insisted that all fonts should be locked.

St Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTCSt Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTC

The chancel was built around 1230.  The east window is either late Early English or early Decorated style.  The windows either side of the sanctuary are of the Decorated Period.  The low window behind the Rector's stall dates from 1290.  The glass in the windows is 19th century.  In the North wall is a 14th century aumbry and on the south wall is a 14th century piscina.

St Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTC

Two more windows. The first carries the inscription: 'To the Glory of God and to the dear and lovel memory of Augustine David Crake Vicar at Cholsey who entered into Rest 18 January 1890.' and the second:'To the dear and loved memory of Wilfred Seymour Crake B.A. Curate of St Mary;s Reading, who entered into the Joy of his Lord July 23 1894. "Until the Day Break"'.

St Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTCSt Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTC

The window depicting St Francis carries the inscription: "In memory of Francis Moscati 11th June 1902 to 13th April 1977 from his loving wife Nick.". The other window showing the young clergyman is an actual portrait of Wilfred Seymour Crake who died aged 27.  He was the eldest son of the Rector, Edward Ebenezer Crake. Although there is no plaque, there is a cartouche in the window with the initials WSC. This and the two lovely windows either side of the sanctuary (above) in memory of Wilfred and Augustine Crake are the work of Edward Frampton 1872-1923, although they do not appear to be signed.

St Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTCSt Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTC

This is the Rochester Monument, incribed: "To the memory of Charles Rochester Esq. and Leonora his wife third daughter of Charles Eversfield Esq. of Denn in this county. She departed this life on the third day of March 1756 in the forty ninth year of her age, leaving her affectionate husband to deplore his loss who after enduring with Christian fortitude and resignation a long and painful illness was at length mercifully released there from on the twentieth of November 1758 in the fifty sixth year of his age."

St Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTC

The west tower is the oldest part of the building dating from AD 900-950. It measures 18 feet internally and just over 23 feet externally.  It is a typical example of a defensive tower (although rather hidden by scaffolding when we visited!) built not only as a place of worship but for refuge against the Vikings who landed at Cuckmere Haven and raided the coastal villages. The original windows can be traced on the outside on the north and south walls, 15 feet above ground level.  Their arched headings are constructed of Roman bricks.  A Roman road passed through Jevington and a Roman coin has been found in the churchyard.

The present windows are Victorian, the west window and door date from this period too.  The outer walls show good examples of herringbone flint work and green sandstone quoins of long and short work.  On the West face modern carvings were incorporated in 1961.  The central archway from the nave to the tower is Saxon but the smaller arches flanking it are Victorian.

The tower contains two bells.  Originally there were four but three were sold in the 18th century.  The larger of the two bells is termed an "ancient bell" of the Brede group dating from 1456 - 1486.  Very few of these survive.  It is inscribed "Sancta Katerina Ora Pro Nobis",  Holy Catherine speak for us.  The bell frame dates from the same medieval period and is one of the oldest in the country.  The small bell is probably a Sanctus bell and is inscribed "W Gyles Captan John Wood made me 1698."

St Andrew, Jevington, Sussex - 22nd October 2004 - MTC

The small parish consists of the village of Jevington, the hamlet of Filching and the more populated area of Wannock; some 320 residences.

The information on this page comes largely from the excellent guidebook available in the church written by Rosalind Hodge.

Jevington church have their own web site here.

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